Doing IT properly is impossible…

We often sit , maybe waiting for a train, and, short of a good book, we ponder why something isn’t better. Why is my daughter more interested in playing on her new phone then doing her piano practice? Why do mobile phones hang up on you even though the signal is displayed as strong? Why is one train platform tasked with receiving three trains in the next three minutes when the platform next to it is idle for the next 30 minutes?

When you visit organisations that run these infrastructures (lets exclude my daughter’s piano issues for now) we often find that challenges like the above are often attributed to IT. quotes like “The windows mobile operating system was just not designed to do this with so little hardware resources available” or “The damned system sets the priority like that, we have no control over it.”  ie the fault usually ends up at the door step of those that can not defend themselves and IT comes up a lot. But how can this be?

Architecting the dream information castle

Resources are in short supply, people are afaraid to make the wrong decision and that can only mean one thing for IT. Information provisioning is key. I remember back in 1988 we were wondering about EIS (II), the second version of executive information systems that would bring internal and external collected information together to enable executives to make better decisions. Has anything changed?

Who monitors the monitor?

We have all been there. The TV is 2 years old and just before (or after) new year the thing decides to try and desolve itself from all responsibilities. No news, no movies, no drama, no life sports. You might even have taken out the store’s extended warrenty, but the terms and conditions state that a chance of repair has to be exercised (which means that no-one comes for a week to look at the thing, then you wait another week for someone to take it away, and you wait a further 6 weeks for someone to say “you will need a new one”). It’s not what you were led to believe when you paid for the extended warrently. Either way you are left without the TV.